Jake La Botz

Jake La Botz

Adam Lee

Tue · June 6, 2017

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Southgate House Revival-The Lounge

$5.00

This event is 21 and over

Jake La Botz
Jake La Botz
Jake La Botz hit the road at fifteen. He found employment as a roofer, boilermaker, factory worker, and obituary writer. In the midst of this he learned how to play guitar. He played on the streets and in the juke joints of New Orleans, Chicago, and the Mississippi Delta, finding kinship with some of the last of the pre-war era bluesmen: David “Honeyboy” Edwards, “Homesick” James, and “Maxwell Street” Jimmy Davis. La Botz has become known for his “Tattoo Across America Tour,” where he tours the country performing at tattoo shops and as an actor in films in which he sometimes sings his original songs: RAMBO dir. Sylvester Stallone, ANIMAL FACTORY dir. Steve Buscemi, ON THE ROAD dir. Walter Salles.

Jake has toured extensively in the U.S. and Europe and has opened for Ray Charles, Etta James, Dr. John, Mavis Staples, JD McPherson, Buddy Guy, Jr. Wells, Taj Mahal, Buckwheat Zydeco, Tony Joe White, John Hammond, The Blasters and a host of other greats. He recently starred as "Jake Haynes" in the feature film THE GRACE OF JAKE, and as “The Shape” in the new stage musical GHOST BROTHERS OF DARKLAND COUNTY written by Stephen King and John Mellencamp with musical direction by T-Bone Burnett.

QUOTES:

"Jake La Botz is a creator of dark poetry and haunting song, the kind of music that gets in your bones and rides you for days, a sound and vision only those who've been to the bottom and clawed their way back up can generate. His midnight gifts evoke Hank Williams and Skip James as much as Tom Waits and Dylan. Not everybody will get this music - because not everybody is ready for the truth." --Jerry Stahl (author of Permanent Midnight)

"From the first time I heard him playing guitar and singing his songs in a smoky bar on La Brea and Sunset, I became a devoted fan of Jake La Botz. Effortlessly blending authentic blues, rock, country, and gospel, he's created a sound and style that is original and yet instantly familiar. Soulful, personal, painfully funny and sad; his beautifully crafted songs always inspire me to sing along. He's a good buddy of mine, but I'd say this even if I didn't like him personally, (which is impossible, by the way) he's a true American classic, a gift, and a musical resource that is a joy to be discovered time and time again. Long Live La Botz!" --Steve Buscemi (Actor, Director)
Adam Lee
Adam Lee
Adam Lee is restless. “I’ve never been comfortable sitting still,” he notes, in the midst of preparing his debut solo album, ‘Sincerely Me,’ for release August 26th. A varied and engaging collection of songs, the record finds Lee constantly in motion. He criss-crosses genre and influence, always sure of his footing, yet unwilling to remain planted in one spot. Adam Lee is a man moving forward. Moving on. ’Sincerely, Me’ reads like a goodbye note. A farewell to home.

A departure indeed, but that’s something he’s used to. The son of an Air Force officer, Adam Lee spent much of his youth in transit. Music, however, was a constant, and a childhood spent moving state to state, and sometimes country to country, prepared him for a life traveling on the road. “I grew up saying goodbye,” he says, “and it teaches you to appreciate what’s on the horizon.”

Initially writing folk and alt-country, he fronted Kansas City-based Adam Lee & the Dead Horse Sound Company. Their first album ‘Ghostly Fires’ was released in 2008. The band committed to a more traditional country and western sound for their second album, ‘When the Spirits Move Me’ and logged many miles supporting the 2010 release. Lee’s time in the honky tonks paid off; he was nominated for one of Dale Watson’s Ameripolitan Awards and found homes for his country songs in feature films (writer/director Kevin Smith’s Red State and TUSK).

He’d soon found a new home for himself as well — on the Broadway stage. In 2013 he moved to Chicago after being offered a leading role in the Tony Award-winning musical Million Dollar Quartet, under the musical direction of Chuck Mead.

Lee’s wanderlust informed his writing as well, and he soon began crafting songs not tied to a style, but to a feeling. They make up a large portion of the material on ‘Sincerely, Me,’ his first solo album. “I just tried to put the best songs I’d written on the new record, the songs that moved me most, regardless of genre.” In woodshedding the new material he spent much of the past year on the road. He played shows with Frank Turner and Chuck Ragan. He completed his second European tour. He kept writing and soon, he found himself in the open-ended world of Americana.

His mutability is readily apparent throughout ‘Sincerely, Me,’ and he continually plays with genre, style, and influence. ’Sing With Me,’ is a raucous, punk inflected anthem, working to reconcile youthful and rebellious optimism with sobering adult realities. This song leads directly into ‘Patrick’ a fatalistic and tragic tale of two brothers, laid upon a sparse backdrop of Irish-styled fiddle and banjo.

The most country song of the collection, ‘What I Need,’ comes across more tragedy than two step, a deceptively upbeat confessional, uncluttered from all the smoke and neon. Underscored with upright bass and saloon-style piano Lee sings “I’m patient, and I’m thoughtful, and really, really insecure/ but I’ve found ways to make it worse.”

All told, ‘Sincerely, Me’ is a strong and diverse debut, a record reminiscent of a life spent in no one place in particular. Roots-rock songwriter Justin Wells sums up this sentiment. “Somebody’s gonna file this album under Americana, but that's because Adam Lee isn't a genre… it nods at several American musics without knowing the meaning of derivative.” In that context, the album title could be taken a different way. ‘Sincerely, Me’ is Adam Lee at his most honest, his most vulnerable, and ultimately, his most engaged. A restless mind put at ease not by comfort or consistency, but by forward momentum. Adam Lee is heading somewhere, and even if we’re not quite sure of his next stop, we’re happy to come along.
Venue Information:
The Southgate House Revival-The Lounge
111 East 6th Street
Newport, KY, 41071
http://www.southgatehouse.com/