event

Grace Pettis, Robby Hecht
Sat July 13, 2024 7:00 pm (Doors: 6:00 pm )
The Southgate House Revival - Revival Room
Ages 18 and Up
Grace Pettis

“I thought a lot about what to call this album. I tossed around a lot of different titles, pulled from lines I liked or themes the record seemed to have. But in the end, it really had to be called Working Woman because the album, like the song, is not subtle. It’s about recognizing and honoring the work that women do in every space in our society. It’s about claiming our own power and place in the world. This record is about the work women do and valuing that work,” says Grace Pettis, explaining the title of her new debut album for MPress Records, Working Woman.

Produced by lauded singer-songwriter Mary Bragg, and mixed by 2x Grammy® award winner Shani Gandhi (Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical), the record features an all-female/non-binary band. The rest of the album credits are female/non-binary as well: co-writers, engineers, photographer, and graphic designer included. Guest contributions come from Indigo Girls (“Landon”), Ruthie Foster (“Pick Me Up”), Dar Williams (“Any Kind of Girl”), The Watson Twins (“Never Get It Back”), Gina Chavez (“Mean Something”) and Mary Bragg (“Paper Boat”).

Grace epitomizes the term singer/songwriter. As a singer, her voice is both powerful and beautiful, and she uses it like a fine arts painter to color and craft her songs. American Songwriter Magazine wrote “As a decorated songwriter, Pettis blurs the lines between country, Americana and folk. Her soulful delivery of calculated lyric lines helps her tell stories for all generations.” Her songs have been recorded by many esteemed artists, including Sara Hickman and Ruthie Foster. Grace explains, “The songs that ring the truest often come from my own feelings and memories. People need upbeat songs they can dance to, but they need sad songs, too. Hard songs. The songs that are the hardest and most painful to write seem to be the most healing. I write from wherever I happen to be. If I’m happy, I write a happy song. If I’m sad, I write a sad song. If the world is on fire, so are my songs.”

Asked about her conscious choice to work with an all-female/non-binary creative team for Working Woman, Grace explains, “As a feminist, I can’t complain that the industry is unfair to women if I’m not actively working on whatever level I’m at to change it for others. I don’t feel the need to cloak my own feminism in metaphors anymore or sidle up to it with a wink so I don’t offend anyone. Here in the US, women make up something like 22% of chart-topping artists, across all genres. We are 2% of the producers credited on those charts, and just about 12% of the songwriters. Less than 1% of chart-topping songs are written without men. Meaning, we are literally not hearing women. The fact is, women like me work our tails off. We have to, to carve out our place in the world. It’s past time to recognize and honor women’s contributions. This is our time and we will make the rules. We are not asking for respect anymore. Now, we are demanding it.”

From an early age, Grace was encouraged to speak her mind and to express herself musically. Words and music were the family heirlooms she inherited from her parents, a traveling songwriter (Pierce Pettis) and poetry scholar (Dr. Margaret Mills Harper), who were divorced by the time she was a small child. As a result of that separation, she was raised in two very different parts of the “Deep South”: the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia, and the backwoods of Mentone, Alabama. Grace’s musical influences run the gamut of Southern sounds: from mountain music and gospel to country and folk to R&B and hip hop. Pierce was on the road a lot, and the albums he left for her to listen to while he was touring the country and sending paychecks home were both a way to be closer to him and a driving influence in her writing from an early age. She was writing songs as soon as she could talk and enlisting help from her mom to get them down on paper by the time she was five.

An award-winning singer-songwriter from Austin via Alabama, this isn’t Pettis’ first rodeo. For Grace, who has been characterized as “a little bit folk, a little bit country/Americana, and a whole lot of soul,” 2020 had many silver linings. She signed with MPress Records, released three critically acclaimed singles – “Landon”, White Noise”, and “Drop Another Pin” (with “Landon” landing at #10 on The Bluegrass Situation’s year-end “The Women Who Wrote Our 2020 Soundtrack”), and recorded Working Woman in Nashville.

Robby Hecht

Robby Hecht has been captivating audiences as a touring singer-songwriter for over two decades, combining quietly impactful songwriting reminiscent of Tom Waits or Jim Croce with the graceful vocal resonance of James Taylor. With a remarkable blend of insightful lyricism, memorable melodies, and a voice that carries both strength and tenderness, his music resonates with audiences from all walks of life.

 

Robby’s dedication to the craft and collaborative spirit have solidified his reputation as a versatile and respected artist within the industry. He garnered recognition as a songwriter’s songwriter early in his career, winning a number of revered performing songwriter contests and touring across the US and Europe. His music has been the soundtrack for countless journeys, amassing over 25 million streams to date. And with more than 60 songs recorded by other artists, as well as numerous contributions as a featured vocalist, Robby has added his distinct touch to the work of fellow musicians, reaching music lovers through the voices of others.

 

Beyond his musical endeavors, Robby is a passionate advocate for mental health awareness. Openly discussing his own journey with bipolar disorder, he shines a light on these issues, breaking the stigma and offering support and inspiration to those who may be facing similar struggles.

 

Robby's highly anticipated album, Not a Number, is a powerful reflection on the evocative and turbulent journey of the past few years. Featuring twelve introspective tracks, each with the potential to become a personal favorite, the album weaves together themes of divorce, emotional recovery, nostalgia, the unity of humanity, and the profound significance of individual experiences. It is a musical tapestry that resonates deeply with listeners, meeting them wherever they may be on their own life's path.

 

Not a Number was produced by veteran singer-songwriter and sought after guitarist Anthony da Costa, who also contributed much of the arranging and instrumentation on the album. The recording process spanned nearly two years, initially involving remote performances exchanged during isolation until Anthony and Robby were able to complete the project together in person. The album features notable guest vocal performances by acclaimed artists from Nashville and beyond including Caroline Spence, Jess Nolan, Jill Andrews, Katie Pruitt, Lydia Luce, The Sea The Sea, Ruth Moody, and Trousdale.

Robby Hecht's music is a testament to the power of storytelling and the ability of songs to touch our souls. His insights and captivating melodies create a truly unforgettable musical experience, inviting you to embark on a contemplative journey through the landscapes of the heart and mind